The Most Painful Burn is the One You Could Have Prevented

Among the hidden hazards in your home, there are two especially harmful to children: Flammable liquids, like gasoline and paint thinner. The other is ordinary household tap water, that’s too hot for a child’s skin. Protecting your loved ones from flammable liquids and extremely hot water should come down to common sense. But with so many accidents, injuries and deaths every year, its easy to we that common sense is sometimes overlooked. Its not hard to figure out why, either. As parents, we become preoccupied or distracted in going about our daily lives, and that’s where the problems lie. All it takes is a split second, to change the course of your life.

Gasoline Safety

That is the only thing gasoline is for to power a motor. Its not a solvent, not a cleaning fluid, and should never be used that way, NEVER!

Dangerous flammable vapors are released in your home or garage every time them is a spill, or when the container of gasoline or other flammable liquid is not property sealed.

The silent, invisible vapors can travel, and if these vapors reach a source of ignition, like a faulty electric outlet, the spark from a running motor, or the pilot light of a home appliance the vapors can ignite and blow you clean out of the house.

Gasoline should always, ALWAYS, be tightly sealed in an approved container, kept out of the house and out of the reach of children. Seal both the spout on the container and the vent.

KEEP GASOLINE TIGHTLY SEALED AND OUT OF THE HOUSE, OR YOUR WHOLE LIFE CAN CHANGE IN A FLASH

Keep gasoline away from ignition sources, in a detached garage or shed, keep It tightly sealed and away from children at all times. BECAUSE WHAT YOU CAN’T SEE CAN KILL YOU.

It Only Takes a Second to Turn a Happy Bath Time Into a Lifetime of Pain

Make sure your water heater is set no higher than 120 degrees. Use a cooking thermometer to check the water temperature in your bathtub. If its hotter than 120 degrees, turn down your water heater, or call a plumbing contractor to turn it down. If you live in an apartment building, have the building superintendent check it for you.

Water doesn’t have to be at the boiling point to harm a child. Infants are plump and cuddly, and their tender skin is a lot thinner than a grown-up’s, and can be scalded more quickly.

So – protect your loved ones. Use common sense when dealing with flammable liquids and scalding hot water. BE SAFE – NOT SORRY.

Safety Tips From The Prevention & Safety Educators

  • Check your batteries in your smoke detectors
  • Install smoke detectors in the hallways
  • A good time to change the batteries in your smoke detector is once in the summer and once in the fall
  • When cooking, with small children in the home, use the rear burners of the stove
  • Turn pot handles toward the rear of the stove
  • Protect your children in the vehicle, have them wear seatbelts
  • Never leave candles burning unattended
  • Never leave your child unattended in a parking vehicle with the windows rolled up
  • Have your children wear helmets when riding their bicycles

Emergency Action For Poisoning

INHALED POISON

Immediately get the person to fresh air. Avoid breathing fumes. Open doors and windows wide. If victim is not breathing, start artificial respiration.

POISON ON THE SKIN

Remove contaminated clothing and flood skin with water for 15 minutes. Then wash gently with soap and water and rinse.

POISON IN THE EYE

Flood the eye with lukewarm (not hot) water poured from a large glass 2 or 3 inches from the eye. Repeat for 15 minutes. Have patient blink as much as possible while flooding the eye. DO NOT force the eyelid open.

SWALLOWED POISON

Unless patient is unconscious, having convulsions, or can not swallow-give milk or water immediately than call for professional advice about whether you should make the patient vomit or not.

AFTER THE EMERGENCY ACTIONS, CALL YOUR LOCAL POISON CENTER